New short stories (sort of) and XB-1’s anniversary

In addition to yesterday’s big news, I have some other ones today. Czech translations of my stories The Brass City and Catching A Ride, both of which have been published in English, appear in the upcoming issue of XB-1, along with my translation of Jason Sanford’s brand new column.

It’s also a special 50th issue since the transition of Ikarie into XB-1 (therefore the retro cover) and the readers can look forward especially to the foreign fiction section, which contains all the Hugo-winning short works from last year: Equoid (divided into two issues), The Lady Astronaut of Mars, and The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere.

Another big anniversary is coming up in April – there’s going to be the 250th issue of the whole magazine’s history (Ikarie and XB-1 together)!

XB-1_1_2015_obalka

New issue of XB-1 and more

The April issue of Czech SF magazine XB-1 was published today, including a new flash story of mine and my interview with Ken Liu (from which I’ll post a snippet here some time later). In other news, the Czech urban SF anthology Zpěv kovových velryb (The Song of Metal Whales) by editor Vlado Ríša is out and had a book launch on Saturday during StarCon convention in Prague. The convention was great though I only had time to arrive just before my afternoon lecture on exoplanets and the following discussion with authors plus the anthology launch.

There’s a new work in English too, nonfiction in this case; I’ve got an article about subsurface oceans in the new issue of Clarkesworld (for resources on the topic, see previous blogpost). It’s been a good week; let’s hope for others like this one to follow.

XB-1 April 2014

 

The Song of Metal Whales

The cover for a new Czech urban SF anthology “Zpěv kovových velryb” (“The Song of Metal Whales”) has been released a couple of days ago. The anthology itself is going to be available in March and I’m really looking forward to the stories by Jaroslav Mostecký, Františka Vrbenská, Anna Šochová, Lucie Lukačovičová, Jan Kotouč, Hanina Veselá, Jana Rečková and Vlado Ríša (who also edited the anthology). I’ve got a piece in there too, a short story titled “Šeré město” (“The Dim City”) set on a colonized planet orbiting a brown dwarf. I’ve actually started writing the story in English, intending to translate it later, but got stuck for a little while, the deadline was growing near, so I finished it in Czech. If the reviews are good, I might some day attempt to translate the other half into English; however, I don’t like translating this way – too many artifacts in the resulting text. Writing directly in English is uncomparably easier than translating either way, especially from Czech into English.

The Symphony of Ice and Dust

The Symphony of Ice and Dust

A science fiction story set on a beautiful but dangerous world at the edge of the Solar System. Published in Clarkesworld Magazine (issue 85, October 2013).

“It’s going to be the greatest symphony anyone has ever composed,” said Jurriaan. “Our best work. Something we’ll be remembered for in the next millennia. A frail melody comprised of ice and dust, of distance and cold. It will be our masterpiece.”
Chiara listened absently and closed her eyes. Jurriaan had never touched ice, seen dust, been able to imagine real-world distances or experienced cold. Everything he had was his music. And he was one of the best; at least among organic minds.
Sometimes she felt sorry for him.
And sometimes she envied him.
She imagined the world waiting for them, strange, freezing, lonely and beautiful, and a moment came when she could not envy Jurriaan his gift—or his curse—at all. She checked with Orpheus how long the rest of the journey would last. The answer was prompt.
In three days, we will approach Sedna.
Chiara decided to dream for the rest of the voyage.